Saturday, July 25, 2015

Obama 'Admin' Changes rules for waiver of 'Oath Of Allegiance For New Citizens'.


Obama 'Admin' Changes rules for waiver of 'Oath Of Allegiance For New Citizens'. (Americasfreedomfighters).

Thanks to Obama, immigrants coming to our country will no longer be required to pledge that they will “bear arms on behalf of the United States” or “perform noncombatant service” in the Armed Forces as part of the naturalization process. Why remove that part of the oath? What’s next-‘SO HELP ME GOD’?

Those lines are in the Oath of Allegiance that people recite as they become U.S. citizens. But the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said people “may” be able to exclude those phrases for reasons related to religion or if they have a conscientious objection.

Here’s the oath as it has stood until Obama.

Oath
“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God.”

The principles embodied in the Oath are codified in Section 337(a) in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), which provides that all applicants shall take an oath that incorporates the substance of the following:

Support the Constitution;

Renounce and abjure absolutely and entirely all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which the applicant was before a subject or citizen;

Support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic;
1.Bear true faith and allegiance to the same; 
and 2. Bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; or 
3. Perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; 
or 4. Perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law.

So let’s sum this up. We have terrorists entering our country legally as well as illegally and we let them skip the part about DEFENDING OUR COUNTRY for religious reasons? That’s insane.


New regulations :

A. Modified Oath for Religious or Conscientious Objections​ ​

1. General Modifications ​t​o the Oath​ ​

An applicant may request a modified oath that does not contain one or both of the following clauses:​ ​

•To bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; and​ ​

•To perform noncombatant service in the U.S. armed forces when required by the law.​ [1] ​

In order to modify the oath, the applicant must demonstrate, by clear and convincing evidence, that he or she is unwilling or unable to affirm to these sections of the oath based on his or her religious training and belief, which may include a deeply held moral or ethical code.​ [2] ​ ​

There is no exemption from the clause “to perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law.”​ [3] ​

2. Qualifying for Modification to the Oath​ ​

Three-part Test​ ​

In order for an applicant to qualify for a modification based on his or her “religious training and belief,” the applicant must satisfy a three-part test. An applicant must establish that:​ ​

•He ​​or she is opposed to bearing arms in the armed forces or opposed to any type of Service in the armed forces;​ ​

•The objection is grounded in his or her religious principles, to include other belief systems similar to traditional religion or a deeply held moral or ethical code; and ​ ​

•His or her beliefs are sincere, meaningful, and deeply held.​ [4] ​

The applicant is not eligible for a modified oath when he or she is opposed to a specific war. Religious training or belief does not include essentially political, sociological, or philosophical views. An applicant whose objection to war is based upon opinions or beliefs about public policy and the practicality or desirability of combat, or whose beliefs are not deeply held, does not qualify for the modification of the oath.​ ​ ​

Applicant is ​Not​ Required ​to ​Belong to a Church or Religion​ ​

In addition, qualification for the exemption is not dependent upon membership in a particular religious group, nor does membership in a specific religious group provide an automatic modification to the oath. The applicant is not required to:​ ​

•Belong to a specific church or religious denomination;​ ​

•Follow a particular theology or belief; or​ ​

•Have religious training.​ ​

However, the applicant must have a sincere and meaningful belief that has a place in the applicant’s life that is equivalent to that of a religious belief.​ [5] Because of this belief, for example, the applicant’s conscience may not rest or be at peace if allowed to become an instrument of war.​ [6] ​

Evidence Establishing Eligibility​ ​

An applicant may provide, but is not required to provide, an attestation from a religious organization (or similar organization), witness statement, or any other evidence to establish eligibility. An applicant’s oral testimony or written statement may be sufficient to qualify for the modification. An officer may ask an applicant questions regarding the applicant’s beliefs in order to determine whether the applicant is eligible for the modification of the oath, to include, a review of the following factors:​ ​

•General pattern of pertinent conduct and experiences;​ ​

•Nature of applicant’s objection and principles on which objection is based;​ ​

•Training in the home or a religious organization;​ ​

•Participation in religious or other similar activities; and​ ​

•Whether the applicant gained his or her ethical or moral beliefs through training, study, self-contemplation, or other activities comparable to formulating traditional religious beliefs in the home or through a religious organization.​ ​

An officer must not question the validity of what an applicant believes or the existence or truth of the concepts in which the applicant believes.​ [7] ​

Results​ ​

Depending on the specific modified oath, USCIS deletes the relevant clauses and the applicant recites the modified form of the oath at the regularly scheduled public naturalization ceremony.​ [8] An applicant is required to take the full oath if the applicant does not qualify for the modification. Otherwise, the applicant is not eligible for naturalization.​ ​

B. Affirmation of Allegiance in Lieu of Oath​ ​ ​

An applicant may request an affirmation in lieu of an oath. The applicant may request this affirmation in lieu of an oath for any reason.​ [9] In these cases: ​ ​

•The applicant substitutes the words “solemnly affirm” for the words “on oath”; and​ ​

•The applicant does not recite the words “so help me God.”​ [10] ​ ​

USCIS grants this modification solely upon the applicant’s request. The applicant is not required to establish that the request is based solely on his or her religious training and belief. Applicants are not required to provide any documentary evidence or testimony to support a request to substitute the words “on oath” or “so help me God.” ​ ​

USCIS must not require the applicant to recite the deleted portions of the Oath of Allegiance at the ceremony. The officer informs the applicant that he or she is not required to recite the deleted portions and that the applicant may take the oath in the modified form.​

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